NOT YOUR BASIC KNOT!

Double River’s Inlet Knot

I use this knot to tie all mono to a swivel.

Regardless the type of fishing (drift, spinner, float, spoon, trolling, etc.) or the type of swivel, I use this knot. If I’m using 30lb+ mono, I may not double it, but I use the same knot.

Double River’s Inlet Knot. Click to enlarge

  1. Take one end of the line and put it through the eye of the swivel
  2. Pull through about 8” and put the line back through the opposite direction but do not pull all the way back through
  3. Take the short end with the loop and cross the main line. Hold with index finger and thumb and cinch the “loop” tag so it comes to more of a point.
  4. Holding the line firmly, twist the line about 8 times. Do not use the swivel to twist as this spins as well.
  5. Take the loop tag and slide it through the opening against the swivel (behind the twists).
  6. Slightly pull, but before pulling all the way tight, wet the line where it pulls tight. This is to prevent the line from getting abrasions causing a weak point.
  7. Pull tight and make sure that all of the line is pulled tight. You may need to pull just the tag and/or the main line and swivel, etc.

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Palomar Knot

I use this knot when tying braid line to any swivel. It’s fairly simple, but extremely strong.

Palomar Knot – Click here to enlarge.

  1. Take one end of the line and put it through the eye of the swivel
  2. Pull through about 8” and put the line back through the opposite direction but do not pull all the way back through
  3. Take the short end with the loop and cross the main line. Hold with index finger and thumb.
  4. Pull the tag end through the loop as if you are tying a regular knot, but do not pull tight.
  5. Open the loop on the tag and put the swivel through it before pulling tight.
  6. Pull tight. You may have to pull very tight and pull the tag and swivel as the braid doesn’t slide easily.


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Bobber stop knot

I use this knot if I do not have any more bobber stops that come with my floats or if they come loose while fishing.

If you need to slide another stop because the old one came loose and/or slides too easily, this is a simple way to tie your own knot without having to cut off your float, beads, weight, etc. to slide another up the line. I use Dacron fly line backing to tie this. It’s a thick, waxy line that slides great on braided line.

  1. Line about 8” of Dacron along the braid (above the bead/float).
  2. Create a loop with both lines together and hold with index finger and thumb.
  3. Drop the braided line and wrap the Dacron around the loop about 4 times
  4. Pull only the Dacron ends tight. Once this is pulled tight, you will need to pull only the braid and again only the Dacron. The tighter you pull, the tighter your stop will be.


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Egg Loop Knot

I use this knot anytime I tie to a hook.

Whether I am using bait or not, this is a great knot and you can use the same leaders to switch to bait should you decide.  This is not an easy knot to tie, but is absolutely necessary for fishing bait.

  1. Slide the end of the line through the eye of the hook sliding it down the hook shank stopping when you get to the first bend in the hook.
  2. Hold the line against the hook, take the main line and start wrapping around the hook shank below the eye of the hook.
  3. Wrap tightly ensuring each wrap is touching the last but being careful not to overlap. Wrap about 20 wraps or almost to the end of the back of the hook shank. The farther down the hook you can wrap, the more room you have for bait. If you only have a few wraps, your line will slice through your bait.
  4. Keeping everything very tight, hold the end of the line you were wrapping with straight down about 1.5” and pull the other end of the leader back through the eye of the hook the opposite way you came in step one.
  5. Keeping tight hold of the lines going straight down, grab the top of the hook shank where the lines cross over and your wraps end with your right thumb and index finger.
  6. Hold the loop that was going straight down with your index and middle finger inside of it create somewhat of a triangle.
  7. You now should have one line that comes straight down and one line that runs along the hook shank (not the same line you wrapped with).
  8. Keep the line that runs parallel to the shank straight and wrap the line that was vertical around the entire hook about 5 times.
  9. Moist where your right thumb and index finger was and pull the opposite end of the leader so that everything slides tight along the backside of the hook shank.
  10. Everything should be very tight and right next to each other. If any wraps are crossed, this creates a weak spot and you need to cut and re-tie.
  11. Trip the tag that runs parallel to the hook shank and you are finished.


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Double hook herring leader

This knot is technically a mooching leader, but I use this knot for all herring leaders.

It’s just a bait loop knot tying two hooks on one leader. Once you learn to tie a bait loop knot, the only thing difficult about this knot is looping the line around the second hook. Keep in mind, the number of wraps is not as important with this leader as you are not actually wrapping any bait through the loop but you do still want the knot to be tied and secure.

  1. Tie a regular bait loop knot on your first hook and trim your tag.
  2. String the other end of your leader through the eye of the hook the opposite way in which you normally would for a bait loop knot. You will come up and out the eye of the hook rather than entering down along the hook shank.
  3. Slide the hook all the way down the leader until you get about 2” from your bottom hook. You want to leave enough space between the hooks so that once you rig up your herring, the trailing hook (bottom hook) is right around the tail of the herring and the top hook is fastened in the herring. If you don’t leave enough space, the fish could short strike and it won’t hook itself. The top hook should also offset the bottom hook meaning, one should face up and one should face down.
  4. Start your wraps around the top hook like you normally would with a bait loop knot.
  5. This is where it gets tricky. Once you pull your line back through the eye of the hook as you normally would, be sure to leave PLENTY of extra line to start your loops. Hold the place where the vertical and horizontal lines intersect
  6. Start your wraps with your vertical line going over the horizontal line. You need to put your trailing hook through the loop every time. Act as if you have one LONG hook that you are putting through the loop.
  7. Wet before you pull tight and pull tight. Again, make sure all your wraps are lined up and none overlap. There should be no space between wraps either.


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Side drifting knot

This is just a rig for side drifting with two hooks.

You will tie your basic bait loop knot on the top hook, and little short cut to fasten your bottom hook. You can tie a herring leader (but leaving less space between hooks) if you prefer to tie two bait loop knots but I have yet to lose a fish because of the knot breaking at the bottom hook with this method and less leader tying time, means more time fishing!

  1. Slide the end of your leader through the eye of the hook.
  2. Go about 6 inches and take the end back the same way you came but do not pull all the way through.
  3. Take the remaining loop and slide the end of your hook through it. It should pull tight now and you should have about 4” of tag sticking off the same end as the rest of your leader.
  4. This is where you want to slide a cheater or corkie (if preferred) down the line going over both pieces of line. This will not only make your bait float better, it acts as a bumper so the fish cannot leverage the hooks off each other.
  5. Slide the end of your leader through the last hook going the opposite direction that you normally would. Running the line up the shank then through the eye rather than through the eye and down the shank.
  6. Slide the hook all the way down the line and put the extra tag that you had also through the eye of the hook as if the two lines are fused.
  7. Leave about ¼ – ½ inches between the “bumper” and the second hook or about 1” if you prefer not to use a bumper (NOT RECOMMENDED).
  8. Drop the tag at the top of the second hook and begin wrapping with the longer line as a normal bait loop knot.
  9. Once you wrap all the way down the hook shank, take the end of the line and pull it back through the eye of the hook as you normally would with a bait loop knot.
  10. Leave a little bit of extra room to do the ending wraps as you need to include the bottom hook through the loop. This can be tricking, but pretend you have an extra-long hook and need everything to go through the loop.
  11. Once you wrap about 4-5 times, we the line and pull tight. If you haven’t already, you can trim the extra tag to about 1/5 inch sticking out of the eye of the hook.

~Bry